Wednesday, February 18, 2009

Christ in You, the Hope of Glory

Many who know me know that one of the most important and transformational parts of my walk with Christ has been an understanding that Christ didn't just die to pay for our sins, but that He also died to give us His life. Christ doesn't expect us to live our lives for Him, but rather He asks us to let Him express His life through us, truly being vessels for Him to live and move by His Spirit. The reason that this has been so freeing is that it takes the pressure off of me and my ability to be obedient, faithful, good, loving. On my own, my tendency is to be none of those things, or it is to do those things because I hope to get something in return (most likely I hope that you will like me and approve of me). For me, living apart from Christ in my own resources (even doing good things) is an exhausting treadmill that never stops. I have often lived in fear of disappointing my friends, wondering if my next mistake would be the one that would lead them to just be done with me for good.

I feel like Christianity so quickly morphs into a life of trying to be like Jesus, and we take on the burden of trying to be holy and nice and loving. That burden was never meant for us. There is only One who is holy, only one who is Good. There was only one who "lived the Christian life", and there is only one "Christian life" – Christ's. And now He offers to live that life in and through us, if we would simply receive it.

Many times I do a poor job of explaining this concept to others, and I think that sometimes I end up sounding like I believe that what we do doesn't matter, and that obedience and active love are inconsequential. I guess in the very truest understanding of the Gospel, what we do doesn't matter, in that we can't earn or deserve Christ's salvation and love. But at the same time, in the truest understanding of the Gospel, what we do goes hand in hand with what we have been given. As The Message says in James 2:24, "Is it not evident that a person is made right with God not by a barren faith but by faith fruitful in works?" What we believe eventually manifests itself in how we act.

I think that ultimately where I am finding freedom is that the root of my actions and my response to God is not from a desire to be pleasing to Him or to get it right. Rather the root is that Christ lives in me, and that all that I need for faithfulness, obedience, and life is found in Christ. And so in every situation, I can be at rest knowing that my performance has no bearing on my standing with Christ. I am free to love, to listen for His voice, and to know that it is not up to me at all. My job is to be available to Christ and to trust His work in me. So for example, there is a person in my life that I really struggle to love sometimes, and there was a root of bitterness growing in me. My first response to them was frustration and eye-rolling, and the harder I tried to do otherwise, the more that response grew. But recently before spending some time with them, the Lord gently reminded me to let Him be my life. He reminded me that Christ in me loved this person; Christ in me understood their heart correctly and could help me see them in His eyes; Christ in me had the life and patience that I did not have on my own, if I would simply rest in Him. And so I asked Christ to live His life through me, and the difference was night and day. I enjoyed being around this person, I did not resent them at all, and God really blessed that time.

Christ in you, the hope of glory, is not simply a nice verse in Colossians. For a Christians, Christ truly lives in us, and He alone is our hope in every situation, every moment. He is my faithfulness in my marriage, my kindness to my children, my wisdom in confusing situations, my peace in frustration, my ability to honor God with my life. And in that, there is deep rest for my soul. Matthew 11:28-30 in The Message says, "Are you tired? Worn out? Burned out on religion? Come to me. Get away with me and you'll recover your life. I'll show you how to take a real rest. Walk with me and work with me – learned the unforced rhythms of grace. I won't lay anything heavy or ill-fitting on you. Keep company with me and you'll learn to live freely and lightly." Amen.

5 comments:

sarawr said...

thanks for this, marshall--i really needed it. it's a tough line line to walk sometimes, and i do end up a lot of times on the side where i'm trying to get it right, instead of letting Christ do it in me, through me. so this was definitely really encouraging =)

sarawr said...

thanks for this, marshall--i really needed it. it's a tough line line to walk sometimes, and i do end up a lot of times on the side where i'm trying to get it right, instead of letting Christ do it in me, through me. so this was definitely really encouraging =)

Marshall Benbow said...

Great to hear from you, Sarah. I hope that all is well down you way!

Jen said...

You should read Martin Luther...I think you'd find you have a lot in common. Luther was all about the whole Christ comes to free us and it isn't about our works, but free don't is what really is the driving force of good works and living life by the Spirit. Yay! I learned something in class!

Macon said...

Amen, brother!